About the Job

By joining the Air Force as a Pilot, you'll be entering into an 'Officer Aviation' role. This term refers to a handful of Air Force Officer aircrew and ground-based mission controller roles. In an Officer Aviation role, you'll become a world-class leader and manager and operate some of the most advanced aircraft and aviation systems in the world.

As an Air Force Pilot, you'll be responsible for operating military aircraft. Depending on your role, you'll fly either fighter jets, or fixed wing aircraft. Getting your wings and undertaking a career as a Pilot isn't easy, but if you're tough, ambitious, and you have a passion for the skies, you might just have what it takes.

While Air Force Pilots operate aircraft, that's where the similarities with commercial airline pilots stop. Flying in the Air Force is the ultimate flying experience, where each mission and each day is different to the last. It's an exciting, hands-on role, if you give it the dedication and motivation it requires. Along with excitement and a high level of responsibility, the Air Force will provide you with a very competitive salary package, and a lifestyle like nothing else. Plus, you'll experience life on board a wide variety of aircraft and benefit from continual investment in your personal and professional development.

The next 10 years will see significant changes in the Air Force as the service continues to modernise, with a focus on information technology and how that can be translated into a competitive warfighting advantage. The Air Force will require highly motivated professionals to manage missions and pilot our aircraft, making real-time decisions relating to missions in an ever-changing environment.

Fast Jet Pilots in the Air Force fly state-of-the-art combat aircraft, including the F-35 Joint Strike Fighters (JSF), which the Air Force is currently acquiring to replace our F/A-18A (Hornets). The JSF is a modern fighter that employs stealth technology and high performance. Fast Jet Pilots also team up with Weapon Systems Officers on the F/A-18F Super Hornet or with Electronic Warfare Officers on the EA-18G Growler to complete missions. The operations that Fast Jet Pilots are involved in are varied and complex in nature and include air-to-air combat and air-to-surface strikes. As a Fast Jet Pilot, you'll be at the heart of Australia's modern Air Force.

There's more to the Air Force than fighter jets. Without the support of fixed wing aircraft like the E-7A Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning and Control aircraft (AEW&C) or the KC-30A Multi-Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) flown by Fixed Wing Pilots, fast jets and the wider Air Force can't operate as effectively. Fixed Wing Pilots also fly the P-8A Poseidon aircraft, performing a variety of missions including anti-surface strike, anti-submarine warfare, search and rescue, and maritime Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions. On top of this, a vital component of joint operations is air transport, and Fixed Wing Pilots fly a diverse variety of transport aircraft ranging in size from the C-27J Spartan and C-130J Hercules through to the giant C-17A III Globemaster.

The Future

Remote Piloted Aircraft (RPA); dedicated Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft; and space-based technologies will join with our advanced, capable platforms as part of a modern Air Force.

Click on the following link for more information on the other pathways within Officer Aviation.


Key Information

Preparing for Your Recruitment Process

This document provides information that will assist applicants for roles in the Navy, Army and Air Force, including details about the recruitment process, how to prepare yourself for assessment, and what to expect if you are successful in joining the Australian Defence Force.

Salary & Allowances

In the Air Force you'll get paid a good salary from day one regardless of your age, experience or qualifications; and your pay increases as you progress through training.

In addition to your salary you'll receive a variety of allowances, extra pay for relevant qualifications – plus 16.4% superannuation, a far higher rate than you're likely to find in the civilian world.


For more details download our Salary Scales.


Locations

Once you have completed flying training, you'll be posted to an Air Force flying squadron based at one of the many Air Force bases across Australia:

New South Wales

RAAF Base Williamtown: F/A-18 Hornet, Hawk 127 and E-7A Wedgetail

RAAF Base Richmond: C-130 Hercules

Northern Territory

RAAF Base Tindal: F/A-18 Hornet

Queensland

RAAF Base Amberley: F/A-18F Super Hornet, F/A-18G Growler, C17-A Globemaster III, C-27J Spartan, and KC-30A Multi Role Tanker Transport

South Australia

RAAF Base Edinburgh:P-8A Poseidon

Victoria

RAAF Base East Sale: King Air 350 and Pilatus PC-9/A training aircraft

Western Australia

RAAF Base Pearce: Pilatus PC-21 and Hawk 127 training aircraft

The exact location of your posting will depend on the type of aircraft chosen for your advanced training.

Subsequent postings could take you to other Defence establishments and possibly overseas on humanitarian and peacekeeping missions.


Requirements

Age

Applicants must be a minimum of 17 years of age on day of entry.

Applicants will not normally be allowed to enter the ADF until they achieve a minimum of 17 years of age, however they may be able to initiate the application process from 16 years of age, depending upon the capacity of their local recruiting centre.

Maximum age on entry is 45 years of age. This allows an applicant to complete three years at ADFA and then Initial Officer Training (IOT) and Initial Specialist Employment Training (ISET) and serve the Return of Service Obligation (ROSO) before reaching compulsory retirement age.

Education & Experience

The requirements for acceptance into Initial Officer Training for an Officer Aviation (Mission Aircrew, Mission Controller and Pilot) are:

Completion of Year 12
Passes in English and three other academic subjects
The desired ATAR or equivalent for your chosen degree. As well as applying to the Air Force for entry, you must also apply to the University through the Universities Admissions Centre (NSW and ACT). The UAC website is:http://www.uac.edu.au 

The completion of Year 12 university entry level mathematics (unmodified) and physics or multi-strand science is highly desirable. 

This entry mode attracts a debt greater than the maximum rate of HECS due to the higher costs associated with ADFA studies ($25,000 per annum). In general terms, this debt accrues (increases) whilst undertaking study, with the maximum debt reached on completion of study. Once the period of study has ended, the debt begins to acquit (reduce) for the remainder of your Initial Minimum Period of Service (IMPS). Once the IMPS period is complete, there is no remaining debt.

Officer Aviation Candidates (Mission Aircrew, Mission Controller and Pilot) can choose to study any degree offered at ADFA by the UNSW except for four-year engineering degrees.  

 

Medical & Fitness

To be enlisted or appointed, you must be medically and physically fit for entry to your chosen occupation. This is partially assessed from the completion of an extensive questionnaire covering your medical history, followed by a physical examination.

You will also be required to successfully pass a physical fitness test before appointment.

For further details on medical and physical fitness standards refer to Physical Fitness Standards for Entry into the ADF and Medical Process for Entry into the ADF.

Period of Service

You will be required to complete your tertiary studies at ADFA prior to completing Initial Specialist Employment Training (ISET). The length of ISET varies between streams.

Although you will have an Initial Minimum Period Of Service (IMPS) of seven years associated with your tertiary studies at ADFA, this will be served concurrently with the nine year Return of Service Obligation (ROSO) you incur from the commencement of your operational conversion.

After your ROSO you may request discharge at any time provided you do not have any additional Service obligations and you provide a minimum of three months' notice.

On appointment you may be able to serve until retirement age of 60 (or 65 for Reservists), subject to your continued suitability for service.

Your Careers Coach can advise on how IMPS and ROSO will relate to your chosen occupation.

Additional Requirements

Physical Requirements

Because of the weight and height requirements of ejection seat equipped aircraft, all Air Force pilots must meet the Aviation Class 1 medical standards (see below).

Weight/BMI Aviation Class 1:

Weight – Nude body weight of between 44 and 105kg (measured in underwear).

BMI – General entry standards.

Height Aviation Class 1:

Height – General entry standards. Sitting Height – 78 to 101cm. Buttock to knee length – 50 to 67cm.

Speech

Have speech that is clear and free from impediment.

Experience

Military flying is in many ways, very different from civilian flying. Therefore the Military Pilots course has a different training philosophy to that of many civilian flying schools.

You'll be expected to progress on course at a rate that confirms your suitability for subsequent operational conversions to front-line military aircraft. Therefore previous flying experience in a civilian environment does not necessarily provide an advantage.

There is no Recognition of Prior Learning with ADF Pilot courses. All successful applicants will fly exactly the same syllabus sorties regardless of previous experience.

The Air Force neither encourages nor discourages potential applicants to consider flying lessons.

Detailed evaluation

All Australian Defence Force Officer Aviation (OA) roles require you to complete a detailed evaluation consisting mostly of examinations and interviews. After passing an initial test and interview at your local DFRC, you’ll move on to take part in the two-day Aviation Screening Program (ASP).

The ASP will take place at the East Sale Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base in Victoria. There you’ll join a group of about ten candidates who are all undergoing further screening for OA.

Over the two days you and your group will do a range of tests exclusive to OA candidates that assess your cognitive aptitude and potential to learn in the aviation training environment. You’ll experience firsthand the training, recreational and accommodation facilities at the RAAF Base. Plus, you’ll get to talk with students and instructors at the Air Academy (AirA) about the different roles and life in the Air Force.

You’ll even receive a flight suit, service patch and hat to wear while at the centre—giving you a taste of life in the Air Force.

At the end of the ASP, you’ll meet with a debriefing officer individually to receive your test results and discuss the Officer Aviation (OA) career options that are available to you: Aviation Warfare Officer, Mission Aircrew, Mission Controller or Pilot.

You’ll be able to take a copy of your report and progression options with you, to talk through with your family. If you’re successful, you’ll need to contact a Defence Force Recruiter to progress your application to Officer Selection Boards.

For more information on Officer Aviation please contact A.C.M.C@defence.gov.au

Aptitude

The Job Opportunities Assessment (JOA) is completed as part of the application process to join the Australian Defence Force (ADF). Some jobs may also require you to complete a further evaluation at a later date.

The JOA is used by Defence to establish suitability for ADF entry, and then identify jobs that best match your abilities.

Further information about the JOA can be found in the Guide to the Job Opportunities Assessment for the ADF.

To get a feel for the types of questions that are used in the Job Opportunities Assessment and how they will look on your screen some examples can be found in the Job Opportunities Assessment Example Questions.

Citizenship

To serve in the ADF you must be an Australian Citizen.

If you are a permanent resident of Australia, the ADF may consider a temporary deferral of the citizenship requirement if the position for which you are applying cannot be filled by an applicant who meets all the citizenship requirements, and then only in exceptional circumstances. You will be required to obtain Australian Citizenship as early as possible following enlistment or appointment.

Find out more in our Citizenship page or ask your local Defence Force Recruiting Centre.

Security Requirements

The Department of Defence requires ADF employees to have a security clearance appropriate to their employment.

A process of background checks, collection of relevant information and if required, interviews, enables the Australian Government Security Vetting Agency (AGSVA) to make an informed assessment of an applicant's suitability for a security clearance.

The minimum security clearance level required is Negative Vetting Level 1 (NV1), and current policy requires applicants to have a checkable background for the previous 10 years.

This means applicants must provide credible referees (non-family members) who are able to provide information about the applicant covering an extended period of time. Required information for an NV1 includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Residence
  • Employment
  • Education
  • Financial information
  • Travel

Some ADF jobs may require a higher level of security clearance such as Negative Vetting Level 2 (NV2) or Positive Vetting (PV). Your individual circumstances will determine the number and complexity of the questions and the supporting documents required for these levels.

Australian Citizenship is a requirement for a security clearance and a clearance will only be granted to a non-citizen in exceptional circumstances.

The security clearance is critical to an applicant's successful progression through the recruiting process. It is strongly recommended that all applicants action the Security Clearance Package (ePack) and provide the required documentation without delay to provide the best opportunity to commence training and be employed in their preferred employment category.

For more detailed information on the security vetting process and specific clearance level requirements set by AGSVA, please refer to the AGSVA website.

Support will be provided by DFR during the initial application process.

Training

Military Training

Once you're settled in to the Australian Defence Force Academy you'll undertake six weeks of military training to prepare you for Service life. This is followed by the annual Chief of the Defence Force Parade, after which the academic year commences.

Then in between your academic studies, six hours a week are allocated to military training. This consists of Academy Military Education and Training (AMET) for all three Services as well as Single Service Training (SST).

SST blocks are held at the beginning and end of the year. Through this program Officer Cadets gain equivalent skills to those gained by non-ADFA applicants taking the Initial Officers Course.

During AMET you'll learn about and get involved with:

  • Defence

  • Psychology and leadership

  • Drug and alcohol awareness,

  • Military law

  • Physical and recreational training

  • Military drill and ceremonial training

  • Weapons training

  • Field training

  • Character development

  • English and military communications and

  • Study skills.

You'll also have breaks in study to go on academic field trips, military tours, excursions and adventure training exercises (including five weeks at the Officers' Training School, East Sale, Victoria in Year 2).

During Initial Officer Training and Initial Specialist Employment Training, members may be required to pay a contribution towards meals, accommodation and utilities.

Employment Training

Initial Specialist Employment Training (ISET)

All Air Force pilot trainees will complete the Pilot Basic Course at 1FTS at RAAF base East Sale and the Pilot Intermediates Course at 2FTS at RAAF Base Pearce.  Both of these courses are on the PC21. Only those pilots being streamed to Fast Jet will complete the advanced course on the Hawk Lead-in Fighter.

Pilot Basic Course. Pilot Basic Course is 24 Weeks in duration about 60 hours of flying and simulation. The flying disciplines on pilot basic course include General Flying (GF), Instrument Flying (IF), Night Flying (NF) and an introduction to medium level visual Navigation (NAV). GF includes manoeuvres such as flying circuits, basic aerobatics, stalling and emergency handling. IF instruction covers basic instrument interpretation skills and flying instrument approaches. Ground training will also be conducted in Aerodynamics, Aircraft Systems, Airmanship, Air Power, Air Traffic Control, Aviation Medicine, Cockpit Systems, Meteorology, Morse Code, and Navigation.
Pilot Intermediate Course. Pilot Intermediate Course is approximately 30 weeks duration with 135 hours of flying and simulation. Aside from developing the flying skills learnt on Pilot Basic Course, students will also be introduced to formation flying and low-level navigation. Trainees will also learn how to operate an aircraft and not just fly it. Those trainees not progressing to the Hawk will undergo a Fixed Wing operational conversion.
Pilot Advanced Course.  The Hawk Lead-in fighter is used on the Pilot Advanced Course so that trainees start to get use to the speeds they will be flying in the JSF, F/A-18F Super Hornet or F/A-18G Growler. Tactical flying and weapons application are also introduced in the advanced course.
Operational Conversions. The operational conversion (OPCON) is the last step in the ISET continuum. Once you complete your OPCON you will be ready to contribute to the application of Air Power and the defence of Australia.

Further Training

You've now graduated from Number 2 Flying Training School and are ready to be streamed onto specific aircraft. This process is called 'conversion'.

By this point you'll probably have a pretty good idea what type of aircraft you're passionate about flying. However, whilst acknowledging your preference, recommendations about the best choice of aircraft based on your temperament, strong points and aptitude will be provided by your instructors.

Air Force instructors are highly experienced and will have been observing you for almost 12 months, so they are well qualified to advise the selection panels on your suitability.

Ultimately, the needs of the Air Force take precedence. However every aircraft option will still provide you with a rich and rewarding career, plus levels of job satisfaction those in other jobs can only dream of.

So whether you're selected to fly a C-17A Globemaster III heavy transport, a KC-30A tanker, an E-7A Wedgetail surveillance and control aircraft, or a state of the art F/A-18F Super Hornet fighter, this is the stage when you learn the specifics of the aircraft chosen.

You can read more about all the aircraft we operate on the Air Force website.

You'll also become fully assimilated into the working environment of your new squadron, learning the theory behind the tactics it employs. Here you will 'crew up' and practise until your team is operationally effective.


Key Information

Preparing for Your Recruitment Process

This document provides information that will assist applicants for roles in the Navy, Army and Air Force, including details about the recruitment process, how to prepare yourself for assessment, and what to expect if you are successful in joining the Australian Defence Force.

Salary & Allowances

In the Air Force you'll get paid a good salary from day one regardless of your age, experience or qualifications; and your pay increases as you progress through training.

In addition to your salary you'll receive a variety of allowances, extra pay for relevant qualifications – plus 16.4% superannuation, a far higher rate than you're likely to find in the civilian world.


For more details download our Salary Scales.


Locations

Once you have completed flying training, you'll be posted to an Air Force flying squadron based at one of the many Air Force bases across Australia:

New South Wales

RAAF Base Williamtown: F/A-18 Hornet, Hawk 127, and E-7A Wedgetail

RAAF Base Richmond: C-130J Hercules

Northern Territory

RAAF Base Tindal: F/A-18 Hornet

Queensland

RAAF Base Amberley: F/A-18F Super Hornet, F/A-18G Growler, C17-A Globemaster III, C-27J Spartan, and KC-30A Multi Role Tanker Transport

South Australia

RAAF Base Edinburgh: P-8A Poseidon

Victoria

RAAF Base East Sale: King Air 350 and Pilatus PC21 training aircraft

Western Australia

RAAF Base Pearce: Pilatus PC21 and Hawk 127 training aircraft

The exact location of your posting will depend on the type of aircraft chosen for your advanced training.

Subsequent postings could take you to other Defence establishments and possibly overseas on humanitarian and peacekeeping missions.


Requirements

Age

Applicants must be a minimum of 17 years of age on day of entry.

Applicants will not normally be allowed to enter the ADF until they achieve a minimum of 17 years of age, however they may be able to initiate the application process from 16 years and six months of age, depending upon the capacity of their local recruiting centre.

Maximum age on entry is 48 years of age. This allows an applicant to complete Initial Officer Training (IOT) and Initial Specialist Employment Training (ISET) and serve the Return of Service Obligation (ROSO) before reaching compulsory retirement age.

Education & Experience

Applicants must have completed Year 12 with passes in English and three other board accredited academic subjects.

Applicants who are currently studying Year 12 may apply, however progression through the application process will be contingent on reaching these levels.

The completion of Year 12 university entry level Mathematics (unmodified) and Physics or multi-strand Science is highly desirable.

Medical & Fitness

To be enlisted or appointed, you must be medically and physically fit for entry to your chosen occupation. This is partially assessed from the completion of an extensive questionnaire covering your medical history, followed by a physical examination.

You will also be required to successfully pass a physical fitness test before appointment.

For further details on medical and physical fitness standards refer to Physical Fitness Standards for Entry into the ADF and Medical Process for Entry into the ADF.

Period of Service

You will be required to undertake Initial Officer Training (17 weeks, at the Officer Training School at RAAF Base East Sale, VIC) then complete Initial Specialist Employment Training (ISET). The length of ISET varies between streams.

You will incur a nine year return of Service Obligation (ROSO) from the commencement of your operational conversion.

After your ROSO you may request discharge at any time provided you do not have any additional Return of Service Obligations and you provide a minimum of three months' notice.

On appointment you may be able to serve until retirement age of 60 (or 65 for Reservists), subject to your continued suitability for service.

Your Careers Coach can advise on how ROSO will relate to your chosen occupation.

Additional Requirements

Physical Requirements

Because of the weight and height requirements of ejection seat equipped aircraft, all Air Force pilots must meet the Aviation Class 1 medical standards (see below).

Weight/BMI Aviation Class 1:
Weight – Nude body weight of between 44 and 105kg (measured in underwear). BMI – General entry standards.
Height Aviation Class 1:
Height – General entry standards. Sitting Height – 78 to 101cm. Buttock to knee length – 50 to 67cm.
Speech
Have speech that is clear and free from impediment.
Experience

Military flying is in many ways, very different from civilian flying. Therefore the Military Pilots course has a different training philosophy to that of many civilian flying schools.

You'll be expected to progress on course at a rate that confirms your suitability for subsequent operational conversions to front-line military aircraft. Therefore previous flying experience in a civilian environment does not necessarily provide an advantage.

There is no Recognition of Prior Learning with ADF Pilot courses. All successful applicants will fly exactly the same syllabus sorties regardless of previous experience.

The Air Force neither encourages nor discourages potential applicants to consider flying lessons.

Detailed evaluation

All Australian Defence Force Officer Aviation (OA) roles require you to complete a detailed evaluation consisting mostly of examinations and interviews. After passing an initial test and interview at your local DFRC, you’ll move on to take part in the two-day Aviation Screening Program (ASP).

The ASP will take place at the East Sale Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base in Victoria. There you’ll join a group of about ten candidates who are all undergoing further screening for OA.

Over the two days you and your group will do a range of tests exclusive to OA candidates that assess your cognitive aptitude and potential to learn in the aviation training environment. You’ll experience firsthand the training, recreational and accommodation facilities at the RAAF Base. Plus, you’ll get to talk with students and instructors at the Air Academy (AirA) about the different roles and life in the Air Force.

You’ll even receive a flight suit, service patch and hat to wear while at the centre—giving you a taste of life in the Air Force.

At the end of the ASP, you’ll meet with a debriefing officer individually to receive your test results and discuss the Officer Aviation (OA) career options that are available to you: Aviation Warfare Officer, Mission Aircrew, Mission Controller or Pilot.

You’ll be able to take a copy of your report and progression options with you, to talk through with your family. If you’re successful, you’ll need to contact a Defence Force Recruiter to progress your application to Officer Selection Boards.

For more information on Officer Aviation please contact A.C.M.C@defence.gov.au

Aptitude

The Job Opportunities Assessment (JOA) is completed as part of the application process to join the Australian Defence Force (ADF). Some jobs may also require you to complete a further evaluation at a later date.

The JOA is used by Defence to establish suitability for ADF entry, and then identify jobs that best match your abilities.

Further information about the JOA can be found in the Guide to the Job Opportunities Assessment for the ADF.

To get a feel for the types of questions that are used in the Job Opportunities Assessment and how they will look on your screen some examples can be found in the Job Opportunities Assessment Example Questions.

Citizenship

To serve in the ADF you must be an Australian Citizen.

If you are a permanent resident of Australia, the ADF may consider a temporary deferral of the citizenship requirement if the position for which you are applying cannot be filled by an applicant who meets all the citizenship requirements, and then only in exceptional circumstances. You will be required to obtain Australian Citizenship as early as possible following enlistment or appointment.

Find out more in our Citizenship page or ask your local Defence Force Recruiting Centre.

Security Requirements

The Department of Defence requires ADF employees to have a security clearance appropriate to their employment.

A process of background checks, collection of relevant information and if required, interviews, enables the Australian Government Security Vetting Agency (AGSVA) to make an informed assessment of an applicant's suitability for a security clearance.

The minimum security clearance level required is Negative Vetting Level 1 (NV1), and current policy requires applicants to have a checkable background for the previous 10 years.

This means applicants must provide credible referees (non-family members) who are able to provide information about the applicant covering an extended period of time. Required information for an NV1 includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Residence
  • Employment
  • Education
  • Financial information
  • Travel

Some ADF jobs may require a higher level of security clearance such as Negative Vetting Level 2 (NV2) or Positive Vetting (PV). Your individual circumstances will determine the number and complexity of the questions and the supporting documents required for these levels.

Australian Citizenship is a requirement for a security clearance and a clearance will only be granted to a non-citizen in exceptional circumstances.

The security clearance is critical to an applicant's successful progression through the recruiting process. It is strongly recommended that all applicants action the Security Clearance Package (ePack) and provide the required documentation without delay to provide the best opportunity to commence training and be employed in their preferred employment category.

For more detailed information on the security vetting process and specific clearance level requirements set by AGSVA, please refer to the AGSVA website.

Support will be provided by DFR during the initial application process.

Training

Military Training

Initial Officer Training: 17 Weeks

Immediately upon joining the Air Force, direct entry officers will normally undertake the Initial Officer Course of 17 weeks duration. This is a live-in course completed at RAAF Base East Sale, located 220 kilometres east of Melbourne (VIC).

The major elements of the course involve introduction to military life, Air Force Values and attitudes, Ground Defence and Weapons training, Leadership and Personal Development, Communication Skills and Air Force Operations studies.

Further details on officer training are available on the Officers Training School website.

The information on the website will provide you and your family with enough information to arrange your personal affairs before appointment in the Air Force and give you an overview of the structure and requirements of the Initial Officer Course.

During Initial Officer Training and Initial Specialist Employment Training, members may be required to pay a contribution towards meals, accommodation and utilities.

Employment Training

Initial Specialist Employment Training (ISET)

All Air Force pilot trainees will complete the Pilot Basic Course at 1FTS at RAAF base East Sale and the Pilot Intermediates Course at 2FTS at RAAF Base Pearce. Both of these courses are on the PC21. Only those pilots being streamed to Fast Jet will complete the advanced course on the Hawk Lead-in Fighter.

Pilot Basic Course will be 24 weeks in duration about 60 hours of flying and simulation. The flying disciplines on pilot basic course include General Flying (GF), Instrument Flying (IF), Night Flying (NF) and an introduction to medium level visual Navigation (NAV). GF includes manoeuvres such as flying circuits, basic aerobatics, stalling and emergency handling. IF instruction covers basic instrument interpretation skills and flying instrument approaches. Ground training will also be conducted in Aerodynamics, Aircraft Systems, Airmanship, Air Power, Air Traffic Control, Aviation Medicine, Cockpit Systems, Meteorology, Morse Code, and Navigation.

Pilot Intermediate Course. Pilot Intermediate Course is approximately 30 weeks duration with 135 hours of flying and simulation. Aside from developing the flying skills learnt on Pilot Basic Course, students will also be introduced to formation flying and low-level navigation. Trainees will also learn how to operate an aircraft and not just fly it. Those trainees not progressing to the Hawk will undergo a Fixed Wing operational conversion.
Pilot Advanced Course. The Hawk Lead-in fighter is used on the Pilot Advanced Course so that trainees start to get use to the speeds they will be flying in the JSF, F/A-18F Super Hornet or F/A-18G Growler. Tactical flying and weapons application are also introduced in the advanced course.
Operational Conversions. The operational conversion (OPCON) is the last step in the ISET continuum. Once you complete your OPCON you will be ready to contribute to the application of Air Power and the defence of Australia.

Further Training

You've now graduated from Number 2 Flying Training School and are ready to be streamed onto specific aircraft. This process is called 'conversion'.

By this point you'll probably have a pretty good idea what type of aircraft you're passionate about flying. However, whilst acknowledging your preference, recommendations about the best choice of aircraft based on your temperament, strong points and aptitude will be provided by your instructors.

Air Force instructors are highly experienced and will have been observing you for almost 12 months, so they are well qualified to advise the selection panels on your suitability.

Ultimately, the needs of the Air Force take precedence. However every aircraft option will still provide you with a rich and rewarding career, plus levels of job satisfaction those in other jobs can only dream of.

So whether you're selected to fly a C-17A Globemaster III heavy transport, a KC-30A tanker, an E-7A Wedgetail surveillance and control aircraft, or a state of the art F/A-18F Super Hornet fighter, this is the stage when you learn the specifics of the aircraft chosen.

You can read more about all the aircraft we operate on the Air Force website.

You'll also become fully assimilated into the working environment of your new squadron, learning the theory behind the tactics it employs. Here you will 'crew up' and practise until your team is operationally effective.